Posts Tagged ‘Fire Protection’


Fire Hazards: Appliances

Friday, January 18th, 2019

Next in our series of common fire hazards is the appliances in your home. Did you know that heating equipment (like space heaters) are involved in 1 of every 6 home fires? Appliances are safe when used correctly, so here are some fire hazards to look out for:

  • Keep everything that gives off heat at least 3 feet away from flammable materials or items.
  • Don’t plug more than one heating appliance into the same outlet.
  • Keep portable gas generators outside and away from windows to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • If you have a fireplace, be sure to have your chimney checked and cleaned once a year by a professional.
  • Don’t leave fires (or candles) burning or heating appliances plugged in while you’re asleep, in another room, or when you’re not home.
  • Clean the lint screen every time you use your dryer. Dryers are responsible for about 9 out of 10 appliance fires.

Teaching Children about Fire Safety

Thursday, September 27th, 2018

What should you teach your children about fire safety? It may be easiest to teach them to never play with fire, but here are some other important things you can teach them:

  1. Matches and lighters are not toys.

  2. Don’t play with electrical cords or stick anything in an electrical socket.

  3. Don’t put anything over a lamp. Thing like blankets or towels could catch fire.

  4. If they hear the fire alarm, to get out of the house and to meet you at the designated spot immediately. Teach them “Don’t hide, get outside.” Lots of children will want to come find you, so be sure they know to not look for you and to leave the house and go to the meeting spot.

  5. If they or their clothes are on fire, to stop, drop, and roll.

  6. Teach them “fall and crawl” to protect themselves from breathing too much smoke.

  7. Teach them to check the door to see if it is hot. If it is, have them use a different escape route because there is probably on the other side and they should not open the door.

  8. Make sure they understand to call 911 if there is a fire and they need help, after they get outside.

 

Depending on how old your child is, will decide how much information you give them but it is important that they understand that fire is dangerous. Once you have a fire escape plan, you can make it a game for your kids and time them to see if they can beat their previous time. This will help them practice and so they can do it quickly when it matters.

What do I teach my kids about what to do if there is a fire?

Friday, July 6th, 2018

Teaching children what to do in the case of a fire is important so they can be safe and know how they can get out of the house or apartment. If you have younger children and infants, designate someone to get them out safely. You’ll also want to have a back up plan for small children just in case the primary person is overcome by smoke and can’t reach them.

 

For children that are old enough to get out safely, teach them…

  1. What a fire alarm sounds like and what to do when they hear it.

  2. Your fire escape plan. Make sure they know two exits out of every room.

  3. To “get low and go” so they don’t breathe a lot of smoke.

  4. To feel the door, door knobs, and cracks to see if they are too hot.

  5. Where they should meet you outside of your house.

  6. If they can’t get out, to cover the door cracks and vents and to signal out of their window with a flashlight or something white.

 

Once you have a fire escape plan, be sure to practice it with your children. You can make it a fun activity and time them and try to get faster and faster each time. You’ll want your kids to know what to do so they can do it quickly because fire is fast. In just two minutes, a fire can be life-threatening. Review what to do with your family often. For example, it can be a quick activity that you do on the first Sunday of each month to make sure everyone still remembers what to do and where to meet. And don’t forget to make new plans if you move into a new house or if it is necessary for any other reason.